Breakfast Tel Aviv style

If you want a full on sensory experience, head to Tel Aviv! I was there with Little B and my amazing mum visiting my sister a few months ago. This is not the first time I’ve been to Israel and so I knew what a treat I was in for, and my taste buds and my soul couldn’t wait.

If I could use two words to describe my time there, it would be NOURISHING CHAOS. Nourishing for my body and soul.

My soul was replenished by spending quality time with my sister and seeing her and Little B bond so beautifully. Also, just being in Israel uplifts me – there is something magical about the energy and the authenticity of that place and its people.

My body was of course nourished (more literally) by all the delicious food, the sun on my shoulders and Mediterranean salty air. However, travelling with an almost 2 year old, who has the will of a stubborn teenager, in a city that doesn’t know the meaning of the word “quiet”…. it was not what you would call relaxing.

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Dinner at the “authentic” The Old Man and the Sea in Jaffa

One of the quintessential meals of Israel is the huge buffet breakfast. It apparently originated when the farmers on the kibbutzim (collective communities established in the 1930’s)  would all come back after a morning of work in the fields and enjoy a communal feast of all the produce of the kibbutz. Meat wasn’t traditionally farmed and so dairy and eggs became the main form of protein which were eaten along with all the fresh fruit and vegetables. We also have this to thank for the creation of the delicious spicy breakfast feast – shakshuka! Everyone sits around a big table and digs in, often using bread as their main utensil for moping up all the deliciousness.

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My brother-in-law’s shakshuka with feta and herbs (the best in the world!)

It was this amazing breakfast tradition that I wanted to recreate at home with my friends and the kids. The chaos of Tel Aviv: the noise, the hustle and bustle and never standing still for a minute was the precise energy that I wanted to bring to my breakfast. And lets just say that with 8 chatty adults and 5 busy kids under 2.5, this was definitely achieved!

Smell: When my guests walked into the house, they were greeted with the unmistakable rich smokey aroma of middle eastern cooking – cumin, coriander, paprika and za’atar spices, eggplant roasting over an open flame and freshly chopped mint and parsley. I also lit a fragrant “High Tea” Glasshouse candle, whose exotic perfumes of cardamom and black tea added depth to the aroma of the room.

One of my girlfriends walked in and said that she could smell Israel from outside our front gate – the first mark of a successful breakfast 🙂

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fresh herbs and vibrant radishes ready for chopping

 

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eggplants roasting for babganoush

Sound: I deliberately didn’t have any music playing because I knew it would be drowned out with all the chatter, demanding toddlers and their noisy toys. The sound of people laughing and talking loudly with the occasional child’s cry was the exact backdrop that I wanted for my Tel Aviv breakfast.

Sight: A table full of fresh bread, soft creamy cheeses, and colourful dips, alongside roughly chopped salad, seasonal fruit and cooked eggs – this is what an Israeli breakfast looks like.

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three cheeses and dips
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Spiced chickpea & fresh vegetable salad (Jerusalem, Ottolenghi)
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Mud Australia bowls

The decor and servingware was a mixture of colours and styles, selected to reflect the disorder of life in Israel – nothing is too perfect but it somehow just works. I used different textures – wood, ceramic, glass and metals, as well as lots of bright colours to achieve this. The main colour scheme was that of the Mediterranean – aqua, green and turquoise MUD plates and coloured glasses, with some gorgeous brights thrown in too, as I was so inspired by the colour of the alleys and boulevards of Tel Aviv.

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Touch: How something feels always influences how it tastes – maybe that’s why the soft, warm bread used to scoop up the shakshuka and homemade dips tasted so good. The combination of textures was amazing, with the creamy cheeses and hummus, the slightly grainy roast beetroot dip and and the chunky babaganoush, together with the crunchy bread crust and doughy insides. I explored another aspect of “touch” by combining different temperatures – warm eggs, bread and pastries juxtaposed the cool dips, and fresh salad and fruit.

I can’t end without mentioning the halva cake – I think my favourite dish of the day! Moist buttery cake, layered with slightly chalky but melt-in-your-mouth halva, contrasted by rich crunchy cinnamon walnuts – a texture party in your mouth.

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Walnut and halva cake (Plenty More, Ottolenghi)
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Autumn red fruits

Taste:
On arrival: 

Tahini, date and cinnamon smoothie – gulped up by both adults and kids!

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(The Middle Eastern Vegetarian Cookbook, Salma Hage)

Cold:
Homemade dips: hummus, babaganoush, roasted beetroot, cumin and goats curd dip and tuna dip (again store bought – cant beat Pasta Pantry), and fresh homemade zhoug, a fragrant green, firery sauce, with a pesto-like texture
Cheese: homemade Labne, goats cheese, marinated feta
Spiced chickpeas and fresh vegetable salad
Boiled eggs
Spiced maple, pecan and walnut granola served with plain yoghurt and silan (Israeli date honey)
Fresh red fruit salad – Daddy Rich did an amazing job of cutting this up, he even knew to add the garnish of mint!)
Walnut and Halva Cake – after getting somewhat overlooked during the main meal, I brought this onto the dining table when tea was served and it was devoured!

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Spiced maple, pecan and walnut granola (adapted from Middle Eastern Vegetarian Cookbook, Salma Hage)

Hot:
Breads: rosemary and sea salt focaccia, parmesan and garlic focaccia and seeded , all from BakeBar (no, I’m not superwoman who makes my own bread on a day like this, but I did warm them in the oven)
Labne and za’atar mini pastries garnished with rose petals – even fussy Little B loved these
Shakshuka – I made two to accommodate those that love chilli, and those unfortunate people who don’t!

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Shakshuka (Falafel for Breakfast, Kepos Street Kitchen) 

To end:
Nana tea (Fresh mint tea) – we debated whether the drink is served with the teabag in or out. True to Tel Aviv tradition, it was served on the side!

Honest Outcome:
Good: everyone commented on how authentic the meal was – this is the best compliment I could have received!
They also suggested I go into business making and selling my dips and condiments – while I may not be quite ready for this, it felt really good to know their taste buds and tummies were happy 🙂

Not so good: I didn’t get the timing quite right so by the time the guests arrived, and we actually sat down to eat, the shakshuka was slightly overcooked! Lesson learned: prepare everything before but only put the pan on the heat once the guests have arrived

Please let me know (leave a comment) any other recipes that you would love to try xx

 

 

 

 

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One thought on “Breakfast Tel Aviv style

  1. Brilliantly captured la!!
    Wish we could bottle that smell in your house!! You can add that to your relish business :))
    Ps. Could polish off that cake right now actually :))

    Like

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